The Urban Oarsman & Son build a Canoe part two

Weekend two of the Canoe Build:

 

This Sunday we ripped some strips for the stem and stern  laminations.

Paul’s Canoe build,  ripping strips for the laminated stem and stern.

We used the shopsmith, and a fingerboard to rip some philippine mahogany I had into 3/16″ strips.  We cut five strips for each stem piece.

We then used Tightbond II glue to glue the strips together.  Here is Paul slathering the strips with the glue.

Paul’s Canoe build, laminating the stem and stern pieces.

After the strips were buttered with glue, we clamped them to the forms.

Paul’s Canoe build, lamination the stems to the forms.

Note that we have used Tuck Tape to keep the glue from sticking to the forms.

Paul’s Canoe build, stem & stern all clamped up.

We then wiped up all of the glue overflow.  Because it is early December and the shop is relatively cold, I set up a heat lamp to shine on each stem piece.

When we bought the wood for the canoe, we got a number of ¼” by ¾” bead and cove strips, a number of ¼” by 1¾” strips and a 1¾” by 7½” cedar board, all about 16′ long.  There were enough  ¼” by ¾” bead and cove strips to do one-half of a canoe.  Paul and I decided to use the ¼” by 1¾” strips as there were enough to do an entire canoe.  We graded the strips as to colour. In the photo, the gunwale strips are to the right, keel strips to the left.

We then ripped each strip in half, putting one in the Port side pile and the other into the Starboard pile…this way the canoe should have the same (or very similar) colour pattern on each side.

Paul’s Canoe build, ripping the strips into  ¼” by ¾” strips.  Note the home-made outfeed table.

We measured and we should have enough strips after we bead and cove them.  As we get closer to the keel, the length of strip necessary will diminish.  We may be able to get “two” strips out of “one” near the keel.

If not, we can always use some of the original ¼” by ¾” bead and cove strips.

 

Three photos of the stem & stern laminations, the ¼” by ¾” strips in two (Port & Starboard) bundles.

Paul’s Canoe build, stem lamination drying, two bundles of strips.

Paul’s Canoe build, other stem lamination drying, two bundles of strips.

Paul’s Canoe build, ready for the next day’s build.

Next steps?  Beveling the stem and stern pieces and routing a bead and cove into the strips.  Maybe we will get some strips put on.

Bead and Cove bits.

Good rowing (maybe good paddling) to you,

 

Mike

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The Urban Oarsman & Son build a Canoe!

A situation faced by many an Oarsman…

What do you do when your Son (or Daughter) tells you that they are a paddler?

…Why you build a canoe in your new garage/workshop with them of course!

 

PAUL’S CANOE BUILD

 

My son Paul wanted to build a cedar-strip canoe.

 

I found some cedar strips and a strongback for sale on Craig’s List.  A fellow had build a canoe and had about 50 ¾” bead & cove strips, about 50 1¾” square edge strips, a 1¾” by 8″ by 16′ long clear red cedar plank, and a strongback left over from his project. (we never did see the finished canoe)  With my new Garage/Workshop finished and Gwragedd Annwn refurbushed and out of the way, this will be the first new build.

Paul has chosen The Bear Mountain “Hiawatha” design by Ted Moores from his book “Canoecraft”.  To quote “Canoecraft”: “This Bear Mountain design has a look that is as traditional as its name, its sheer-line and bow profile harking back to the native forebears of modern canoes.  Its underbody, however, has been shaped to conform to the most up-to-date concepts in paddling efficiency.  The hull is a shallow arch with a moderately flat keel-line that flows into a shallow vee to become a fine deep vee at the bow for directional stability, speed and maneuverability.   The vee is carried as far back as possible so that it acts like a keel for tacking.  As a general purpose or light tripping canoe, it was designed in the tradition of contemporary American cruiser, achieving its optimum waterline shape when paddled level, not heeled over”..

 

Here is the design from Canoecraft:

Paul’s Canoe plans

Paul’s Canoe plans offsets

The way Ted Moore has done his table of offsets it to have two sets of points.  “Chart A” shows the points on parallel lines drawn 2” apart up from the baseline.  “Chart B” shows the points on parallel lines drawn 2” apart from the centreline of each form.  A station is also a form or a mold.  So on “Chart A”, for Station 0 (or the middle form) at 2” from centreline, there is a point 1⅜-“.  This is really just graphing, the only difference being that the axis are the baseline and the centreline and one of the two coordinates for each point is on the 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, or 16 inch line from the baseline.  In “Chart B” one of the coordinates is a multiple of two inches away from the centre line. is exactly two or a multiple of two inches away from the centre line.

The way to make this work is to draw a grid of 2” squares onto the wood you are using to make your forms.  I got a deal on some MDF cut-offs from a sign company across the street from Martin Marine.

Here is what the points look like plotted out on paper.  The red are from “Chart A”, the green from “Chart B”  This is for one-half of Station number 0 or the middle form.

Table of offsets plotted

You can make out the shape of the middle form, for the middle of the canoe.

 

The next step is to draw out all of the offsets onto all of the forms.  You end up with 15 forms/molds, 7 pairs (Station numbers 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, the Bow/stern sections and form/mold 0).

 

One trick you can do is to cut out the forms/molds in pairs by temporarily screwing the pairs of forms/molds together.  Then you only have to drill one set of holes for the finishing nails and drawing out the cutting lines.  Cutting out the forms/molds out in pairs also helps make the two more identical.  If you get really picky, you can reverse one of the forms in the pair during sanding to ensure that both sides are the same.

 

Remember you will need a centre line on EACH side of EACH mold for aligning them onto the strongback later.

Then using a jig (a block of wood with the alignment hole drilled with a drill press) to insure that your pilot holes are drilled square, pre-drill holes at all of the points.  One trick is to cut our the Bow/stern molds together, as well as two #1s, two # 2s etc.

Drilling pilot holes

Tap in finishing nails into all of the holes:

Nail tapping

We used piano wire held next to the nails to draw a line for the outside of the forms.

Paul then used a jigsaw to cut out the forms.  He cut the lines proud and then used the Shopsmith 12” sanding disk to sand the forms down to the mold line.  Note that he is doing the forms/molds in pairs.  Two of the temporary screws are visible at the top of the picture.

Sanding forms to the line

Paul then used a hole saw in the drill press to cut out holes for clamping the bow and stern piece laminations.  Ted Moore recommends 2” diameter holes about 4” apart, centre to centre, 1” from the edge.

Bow & Stern form with clamp holes cut

The next step is to mount the Bow/stern forms/molds to form/mold #6.  We used clamps to temporally hold everything together while we made sure that everything was in alignment.  We decided that our inside stem/stern pieces would be ¾” wide so the bow section is at where Station #6 form/mold is ¾” across, at the top in the picture.  We used screws to hold everything together.

 

You have to have a straight line down the centre of your strongback to centre the forms/molds to.  It is also good to have one straight, square edge to measure from.

 

We squared up and leveled our strongback.  We started with Station mold #0, placing it in the middle of the strongback.  As our strongback was level, we used a plumb bob, held to the centre line on the form, to insure that our station mold was aligned to the vertical.

 

We clamped everything together and then used a hammer to tap the mold into square.

Drilling pilot holes to mount molds to strongback

 

When we were satisfied that everything was square, we predrilled every hole and then screwed it together.  We then placed the bow and stern mold onto the strongback, insuring that the bow and stern were 15’ apart.  We then put in the rest of the forms/molds.

Putting molds onto strongback

You do a lot of looking along the forms, checking to see if the canoe looks fair, that all of the tops of the forms/molds line up, that one does not look to be up or down compared to the others.

Forms attached to strongback

 

Well that is where we are as of December 4th.

Ready for stem laminations

Paul says that he will be up to work on the canoe every Sunday until it is finished.  Next steps?  Laminating the inside stem pieces, preparing the cedar strips.  If we do not have enough, we will cut some from the cedar plank we have.  Paul will also sort the strips trying to get a pleasing planking pattern happening.  He is hoping to finish the hull bright.

Good rowing (maybe good paddling) to you,

 

Mike, the Urban Oarsman.

 

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Wood & Leather Bailers

The Urban Oarsman Makes Wood & Leather Bailers for Gwragedd Annwn.

The Urban Oarsman makes wood & leather bailers

I have made bailers before, out of plastic four litre/one gallon jugs.  The plastic jugs only last so long before sunlight degrades the plastic and they break.  All the bailers that I had have made met this untimely, vampiric death…I have decided to make some Wood & Leather bailers more suited to a wooden boat.  I did like the way the jug bailers worked, as the forward lip of the bailer conformed to the bottom of the boat and they felt balanced when bailing.

Rose midsection and handle plan transferred to the plank using carbon paper

A Philip C. Bolger fan, I decided to use the mid-section of his sailing ship, “Rose” as the pattern for the bailer base.  I decided that the bailer should be about the same size as the plastic ones.

Cutting out on the bandsaw

I had an old piece of cedar door sill hanging around the shop so I used it.  I cut out the base and the handle.

The roughed-out handle

I then cut a notch in the base and attached the handle.

Marking the notch

Cutting the notch

Handle fitted.

Rough fitting done…time to sand and shape.

I used the top wheel on my 1″ belt sander to shape and sand the handle.

Getting a good fit for my hand

I cut a slot into the handle to put a wedge in to help keep the handle in the base.

Glued up, wedge in

When the glue was dry, I sanded and shaped the handle and base to fit my right hand (I am right handed and bail with my right hand).  I took off all the sharp edges.

 

I next marked out the leather scoop/lip on a leftover oar-leathering piece.

Marking out

I determined the width by measuring the distance from the gunnels of the base using a tape measure.  I wanted to insure that the scoop/lip would go come up a little on the base, imitating the plastic bailers shape.  I used sharp scissors to make the cut.

Dry fit

With all the pieces assembled, I final sanded the base/handle to fit my hand and did a final dry fit.

Final test fit

I marked and pre-drilled the holes in the leather.

Drilling

The holes are drilled, time to put the leather on.

Lining up the first copper nail

All the nails are in, time to seal the leather.

Leather attached

I use “Snowguard” on my oar leathers so I decided to use it here too.

Ready to seal

The leather turns much darker after you put the leather seal on.  I put the bailer in the oven on 200° to melt the sealer into the leather and wood.

Fresh out of the oven

Because it is hard to source leather, I made another bailer using an Ikea cutting matt instead of leather using the same techniques I used to make the leather one.  The cutting mats are easy to find.  I did pre-drill the holes in the cutting mat.

Wood & Ikea cutting mat bailer

Finished product:

Finished wood & Ikea cutting mat bailer

I took the bailers and the plastic jug one down to the sailing club and bailed out all of the boats.  The plastic jug bailer performed as expected.  Good balance, lip conforms to boat’s bottom and no spillage.

The “Standard” bailing jug

The scoop on the Ikea cutting mat bailer is too long…the water in the scoop tends to slop over the handle while scooping, wetting the hand of the person bailing.  The scoop/lip did conform to the boat’s bottom, but the leverage of the long scoop made the bailer feel unbalanced.  The plastic cutting board cracked along the nail line.  I guess the Ikea cutting board is not the right material for the job.

Cracks in the cutting board material

The Wood & Leather bailer worked well.  I found that it was easier to bail when I put my thumb over the base of the bailer.

Best hand position

The Wood & Leather bailer did not scoop as much water as the plastic jug one, but in all other respects it performed just as well.  Good balance, the leather lip did conform to the boats bottom and very little spillage.  I am going to use the Wood & Leather bailer and see how long it lasts.

 

It does look much better than the plastic jug one.

Dry rowing,

 

Mike

 

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May 12th, 2013 Row. Around Siwash Rock and back.

The Urban Oarsman Rows Siwash Rock in English Bay

01-May 14 Row001Launching Gwragedd Annwn at the Hollyburn Sailing Club.

 

??????????????????????????????????Rowing towards Stanley Park.

 

??????????????????????????????????Outrigger Canoes & safety boat practice along the shore.

 

??????????????????????????????????Fireboat #1 races into Burrard Inlet.

 

??????????????????????????????????Sentinal Hill in West Vancouver is in the background.  Sentinal Hill is a small remnant of an andestite stll.  It was formed during a period of Cascade volcanism that took place between 31 and 34 million years ago.  The intrusion “Cooked” the sandstone making it harder and more resistant to Glaciation.  Between the “Cooked” sandstone and the basaltic sill, the glaciers did not erode the hill flat.

 

 

??????????????????????????????????A boquet of yellow carnations drifts out with the tide.  

 

??????????????????????????????????Probably a story behind these.

 

 

??????????????????????????????????The Tymac crew boat rushes under the bridge.

 

 

??????????????????????????????????The tide is pretty low and you can see the boulder field lying on top of the Sandstone underlying much of Stanley Park.  

 

 

??????????????????????????????????The boulders are the remains of glacial till that laid atop the Sandstone.  Wave action eroded the sandstone out from underneath the glacial till, leaving the more erosion resistant boulders behind.  

 

 

??????????????????????????????????There are some very large iron eyebolts placed into the sandstone.

 

 

 

??????????????????????????????????When my boys were younger, I used to tell them that tugs tied their towropes to them to tow Stanley Park into place, opening a small inlet wider to form Coal Harbour and widening First Narrows to let ships in.  That is why Lions Gate Bridge was built, because you could no longer just drive across Burrard Inlet at that spot.  

 

 

??????????????????????????????????Siwash Rock is the remains of a volcanic “dyke”  or  “dike”.  The volcanic intrusion “Baked” or “Cooked” the sandstone, making it more resistant to erosion.  

 

 

 

?????????????????????????????????? Hard basalt at Siwash Rock has resisted erosion better than adjacent sandstone.

 

 

??????????????????????????????????The “Cooked” or “Baked” sandstone aspect is more visible on the seaward side.

 

 

 

 

??????????????????????????????????The tide is too low to row around Siwash Rock today.

 

 

??????????????????????????????????A good year for mussels.

 

 

??????????????????????????????????As usual, English Bay has a lot of Freighters moored.  

 

 

??????????????????????????????????Usually a dozen or so south of the shipping channel and two or three on the West Vancovuer Side.  I think that there are 18 designated anchorages in English Bay.  Looks like one of them is going to enter Burrard Inlet.

 

 

??????????????????????????????????The Georgios P is going into the inner harbour.  I hear her ETA at First Narrows listening to Vancouver Harbour Radio, channel 12.

 

 

??????????????????????????????????As she closes in, I can see her bow wave.  She will be at the Bridge in less that 15 minutes.

 

 

??????????????????????????????????It takes me about 20 minutes to row across the shipping channel.

 

 

??????????????????????????????????She is washing off her anchor as she steams in.

 

 

??????????????????????????????????I am waiting on the North side of the shipping channel for her to pass.

 

 

??????????????????????????????????Georgios P is a bulk carrier flying the Greek flag, her home port is in Athens.

  

 

??????????????????????????????????She was built in 2010.  

 

 

??????????????????????????????????She is 190 meters long and 33 meters wide.  

 

 

??????????????????????????????????She passes the Capilano River Channel marker on her way into Burrard Inlet.

 

??????????????????????????????????Georgios P passes by.  A short (20 minute) row later and I am back at Hollyburn Sailing Club.  

 

 

Mike.

Tee Shirt Chart finalfinal

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Widegon Creek…High Fraser Flow Row. June 23rd, 2014.

Widgeon Creek High Fraser Runoff water level.June 23rd, 2014.  According to my Pitt River and/et Pitt Lake Chart, #3062, mid-June has the highest water levels of the year.  I am going to check it out.

 

Widgeon Creek High Fraser Runoff water level.Leaving home with Gwragedd Annwn in tow.  

 

Widgeon Creek High Fraser Runoff water level.Across the narrows, just entering Widgeon Creek.  The water is high.  It is calm with  high clouds.  The “No Power Driven Vessels” sign is in the distance to the right.  Most of my gear is visible in this shot, my axe, GPS, gear bag, water bottle, sun glasses, buckets, bailers, and a red fishing float.  More about the red float later.

 

Widgeon Creek High Fraser Runoff water level. Passing the sign.  All of the pilings at the entrance are covered by water.  

Widgeon Creek High Fraser Runoff water level.The big stump.  I can row anywhere in the estuary, the water is deep enough that I do not have to follow Widgeon Creek’s main channel.

 

Widgeon Creek High Fraser Runoff water level.Passing by the stump.  I have brought a red float to mark the pipe that I ran into on my Widgeon Creek High Water Row.  

 

Widgeon Creek High Fraser Runoff water level.I called this pipe the “Cats Claw” because of the way it scraped Gwragedd Annwn’s hull.  It is an old sign post?

 

Widgeon Creek High Water RowA picture of the pipe after I ran into it back on the Widgeon Creek High Water Row.  The water level was about 18″ lower then than now.  

 

The Urban Oarsman Circumnavigates Siwash IslandA picture of the pipe I took during the Siwash Rock Circumnavigation Row.  The pipe is located where Widgeon Creek and Widgeon Slough connect.  

 

The Urban Oarsman Circumnavigates Siwash IslandThe pipe circled.  I managed to miss it that time.

 

Widgeon Creek High Fraser Runoff water level.I take the float, put it on the end of the pipe and hammer it home with the axe.  The hazard is now marked and if someone should run into it, hopefully the float will prevent damage.  

 

Widgeon Creek High Fraser Runoff water level.I drift away with the current, leaving the now-marked hazard astern.  

 

Widgeon Creek High Fraser Runoff water level.Well that is done.  I am now going to explore one of the right forks past the cabin.

 

Widgeon Creek High Fraser Runoff water level.The depth guage shows over 6½ feet of water.  This is record high for me.

 

Widgeon Creek High Fraser Runoff water level.A Three pointer on the shore.  This is the first time I have seen a deer here.

 

Widgeon Creek High Fraser Runoff water level.I work my way up the right arm leading to the North-East.  The “Gate” looks to be fully submerged.  

 

The GateClose-up Google Earth Picture of the “Gate”.

 

Widgeon Creek High Water RowThis is what the “Gate” looks like with lower water.  I took this picture during the Widgeon Creek High Water Row.  Then there was enough water to slip by to the right of the rocks.  Today there is 18″ to 24″ more water.  I row right over the rocks and continue up the channel.

 

Widgeon Creek High Fraser Runoff water level.The channel runs to the North-East to the edge of the hill.  It then continues to the North, running along the rockface.  There are a few logs to work around.

 

Widgeon Creek High Fraser Runoff water level.An Indian pond lily, Nuphar polysepala.  There were quite a few along this shore.  

 

Widgeon Creek High Fraser Runoff water level.The rockface along the far East side shore.

 

Widgeon Creek High Fraser Runoff water level.The channel turns to the West, and I cannot push on much further. It is too overgrown.

 

Widgeon Creek High Fraser Runoff water level.Working my way back along the East shore.  

 

Widgeon Creek High Fraser Runoff water level.Some open water along the East side.  

 

Widgeon Creek High Fraser Runoff water level.The water mark showes about a 12″ drop.  I wonder when the water level was at its highest?  I row back out to the Right Fork of Widgeon Creek.  I am going to row up the creek, following the current to its source.

 

Widgeon Creek High Fraser Runoff water level.Root Stump in the middle of the creek.  

 

Location of stump2Google Earth picture of where the root stump is.

 

Widgeon Creek High Fraser Runoff water level.There is much water weed in the bends of the creek here.  The water is very clear too.  

 

Widgeon Creek High Fraser Runoff water level.Another dead tree to work around?  Trees across the creek have stopped me before.

 

Widgeon Creek High Fraser Runoff water level.There is enough room for me to get past.

 

Widgeon Creek High Fraser Runoff water level.It has started to rain.  There is a small side channel to Port.

 

Widgeon Creek High Fraser Runoff water level.The side channel does not go very far.  I row up the main channel to Starboard.

 

Widgeon Creek High Fraser Runoff water level.The main channel does not row very far.  This is as far up as I get.  The current is too strong to row against, the water is too shallow to row in but the water is too deep for me to line Gwraged Annwn further upstream.  I need to get higher topped sailing boots!

 

Widgeon Creek High Fraser Runoff water level.I work my way downstream, rowing backwards.

 

Widgeon Creek High Fraser Runoff water level.I am trying to stay in the deeper water in the bends, but away from the banks and the tree branches.

 

Widgeon Creek High Fraser Runoff water level.I let the current carry me downstream.

 

Widgeon Creek High Fraser Runoff water level.I manage to avoid the stumps & snags on this trip downstream.  The rain is easing up.

 

Widgeon Creek High Fraser Runoff water level.The depth guage piling downstream of the cabin.

 

Widgeon Creek High Fraser Runoff water level.The water level has dropped.  

 

Widgeon Creek High Fraser Runoff water level.About 8″ during the row.

 

Widgeon Creek High Fraser Runoff water level.The post, now marked with a orange/red float, is more out of the water too.

 

Widgeon Creek High Fraser Runoff water level.Much easier to avoid!

 

Widgeon Creek High Fraser Runoff water level.I row out of Widgeon Creek and across Grant Narrows.  I load up Gwragedd Annwn for the ride home.  It was a good row.

Tee Shirt Chart finalfinal

Widgeon Creek is a good place to row.

 

Mike

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The Urban Oarsman. A Whale of a Row. October 4th, 2015.

Whale of a Row.The tide chart for the row:

2015-10-05   (Monday)

Time

Height

PDT

(m)

(ft)

06:13am

1.4

4.6

1:39pm

4.3

14.1

7:50pm

2.9

9.5

The rowing plan is to ride the rising tide into False Creek and then out back to Hollyburn Sailing Club.  I want to be on the water early so I can row around in False Creek & visit Granville Island.

 

 

A Whale of a Row On the beach, ready to go by 8:00am.  The seas are calm and it is an easy launch.

 

 

A Whale of a Row A container deep sea freighter  heads out to sea through the morning fishing fleet.

 

 

A Whale of a Row Today I am part of the fishing fleet.  I am trolling a buzz bomb, green and silver.  The rod tip indicates good action with the lure.

 

 

 A Whale of a Row No more freighters coming out.

 

 

A Whale of a Row The False Creek Pirates are heading into Burrard Inlet.

 

 

A Whale of a Row Their real name is Pirate Adventures.  I saw them quite a bit in False Creek during the Vancouver Wooden Boat Festival.

 

 

A Whale of a Row I row past Siwash Rock.  The channel between the rock and the Seawall is awash.  I do not row around the remnant of a volcanic dike and “baked” sediments.  I am staying in deeper water because I am trolling and do not want my lure to catch on the bottom.

 

 

A Whale of a Row There are eleven freighters out in English Bay.

 

 

A Whale of a Row No freighters in the West Vancouver anchorages.

 

 

A Whale of a Row Some fall colour in Stanley Park already.

 

 

A Whale of a Row These two freighters seem to merge into one super long one.

 

 

A Whale of a Row The Pacific Hickory anchored.  Her engines are 2 x 20 cyl., EMD 645E7, Her thrusters: Tunnel thruster 250 hp Propellers: Twin screw, kort nozzle, Fixed pitch Gear Box: 2 falk reverse reduction Gearboxes 4,719:1 For 191 rpm @ propeller BHP 7200.  Her speed is 12.5 knots Bollard Pull: 100t.  She carries 610 t of fuel.

 

 

A Whale of a Row She has only one anchor, to Starboard.  She was built at Saint John Shipbuilding Ltd., Saint John, NB, Canada She flies the  Commonwealth of Dominica flag. Commissioned in 1973 with acomplete refit 2007. Her length overallis 46.78 m (153.47′), Beam,  11.81 m (38.74′), Draft is 6.7 m (22′). 

 

 

A Whale of a Row Ocean Cement barge anchored.

 

 

A Whale of a Row Pretty flat out by the freighters.

 

 

A Whale of a Row Close-up shot of the barge.

 

 

A Whale of a Row The buzz bomb begins to attract some gulls who are diving on the lure.

 

 

A Whale of a Row I am close to the Vancouver Maritime Museum Heritage Harbour.  I reel the line in.

 

 

A Whale of a Row Remains of a sailboat on the Heritage Harbour breakwater.  The boats came ashore during the windstorm (from the west) we had on September 20th 2015.  

 

 

A Whale of a Row More boat bits under water.

 A Whale of a Row On the breakwater.

 

 A Whale of a Row I row over boat debris.

 

A Whale of a Row A chunk of keel on the breakwater.

 

 

 

 

A Whale of a Row This is Oarlock & Sail’s newest build, Ragna, she is a Paul Gartside ‘Riff’ design.  They launched the Gartside Riff on May 23, 2015, from here at the Vancouver Maritime Museum Heritage Harbour dock. 

 

 

 

 A Whale of a Row Oarlock & Sail’s boats Raga, Sam Mac, Vogler and D’Arcy.

 

 

A Whale of a Row I do not know this boat.

 

 

 

A Whale of a Row The North Star of Herschel Island has been moored here for quite a while.

 

 

 

A Whale of a Row Sadly, this wooden vessel has a fiberglass dinghy.

 

 

 

A Whale of a Row Masts and rigging.

 

 

 

A Whale of a Row Her foremast.

 

 

 

 A Whale of a Row English Bay beach with Grouse Mountain behind.

 

 

 A Whale of a Row Northern Spray,.  I always wonder if her clinker planks are the same on both sides of her hull.  

 

 

 

A Whale of a Row Rowing into False Creek.

 

 

 

A Whale of a Row A barge is at the Kits boat launch.

 

 

A Whale of a Row A little tug is tied up to the new dock.  No name, just a registration number.  Kinda cute how this commercial vessel is tied up under the “No Commercial Vessels Permitted sign”.  

 

 

 

A Whale of a Row No name on the stern.  

 

 

 

A Whale of a Row The old dock has been removed and they are building a new one.  

 

 

A Whale of a Row Past the Burrard Street Bridge.

 

 

 

A Whale of a Row I turn the corner and pass Fisherman’s Wharf floats A, B, C, D, & E.

 

 

 

A Whale of a Row Flags show a slight Westerly.

 

 

 

A Whale of a Row End of the cove.  

 

 

A Whale of a Row I row out past the mega-yachts.

 

 

A Whale of a Row Under the Granville Street Bridge.

 

 

A Whale of a Row I row around the corner into Alder Bay.  No anchoring allowed.  One lap and I row back out again.  The wind is starting to pick up from the West and I figure that I should start home now.

 

 

A Whale of a Row Good-bye Burrard Street Bridge.

 

 

A Whale of a Row Sailboat wrecked at Sunset Beach Park.

 

 

 A Whale of a Row I  row around the wreck.  The water is pretty shallow.

 

 

 

A Whale of a RowI cannot tell is the hull is floating at all.  It may still be aground.

 

 

 

 

A Whale of a Row The boat is probably high and dry at low tide.

 

 

A Whale of a Row I continue along towards the Inukshuk.  

 

 

A Whale of a Row Another beached sailboat.  Looks like a San Juan 21.  Poor old Donegal Mist.

 

 

 A Whale of a Row I notice something off the bow of this sailboat.

 

A Whale of a RowIt is a grey whale.  In reading the news reports, they say that it does look to be the same individual that was in the area in August. 

 

 

 A Whale of a Row I take some more pictures.  They identify grey whales by the uniqueness of the barnacle growths on them.

 

 

 

A Whale of a Row The whale seems to be feeding in front of English Bay Beach.

 

 

A Whale of a RowGrey whales are often seen close to sandy shorelines because they dine on small marine invertebrates that they filter from sediment or sand on the ocean floor.  The Grey whale is  coming close to shore and scooping up mouthfuls of sediment and filtering that for his prey.

 A Whale of a Row The crowd is Whale Watching.  I row along the beach, in 5 to 10 feet of water to avoid the Grey Whale.

Whale of a Row gps 2

I do not want to disterb the Whale…or get run into by it.

 

 

A Whale of a Row The Audubon Society Field Guide to North American fishes, Whales & Dolphins says: “Gray Whales (Eschrichtius robustus), grub along the bottom for gammarid amphipods, the staple of their diet, and leave a cloud behind them as they move”.  

 

 

 

A Whale of a Row The Field Guide also states:  “Their spout is not distinctive”.

 

 

A Whale of a Row This is the Whale heading towards me.  

 

 

A Whale of a Row Diving down for a snack.

 

 A Whale of a Row Up again.

 

 

 A Whale of a Row A lot of this activity happened in front of the Boathouse.

 

Four shots of the Whale surfacing and then diving:

A Whale of a RowPicture one. A Whale of a Row Picture two.A Whale of a Row Picture three.A Whale of a Row Picture four.

 

 

A Whale of a Row Probably my best “spout” picture.

The rest of the row is uneventful, and I am back on the beach at Hollyburn Sailing Club by 3:00pm.  

GPS track of the row.  Six hours on the thwart.

Whale of a Row gps 1An unexpected treat, rowing by the Grey Whale.

Tee Shirt Chart finalfinalGood rowing,

Mike

 

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2015 Blood Moon Eclipse Row.

 The 2015 Blood Moon Eclipse Row is organized by the Hollyburn Sailing Club.  This event replaces the cancelled due to weather Fall Equinox Row.

The tides for the row are:  Low Low at 11:27am, 1.4m/4.6′; High high at 5:49pm, 4.6m/15.1′; high low at 12:05am, 1.8m/5.9′.

The tide will be high and outgoing for the row.

 

2015 Blood Moon Eclipse Row Getting Gwragedd Annwn ready to launch.  The wind has been blowing from the South-West all day and there is quite a chop running.  The wind is dying down.  I hope that the chop will too.

 

2015 Blood Moon Eclipse Row A successful launch.  I am rowing over to the fishing pier float to pick up my wife, Pat.  She is coming out for the Blood Moon Eclipse row.

 

2015 Blood Moon Eclipse Row It is still choppy at the club ramp.  The other boats assemble.

 

2015 Blood Moon Eclipse Row Urban Oarsman Matt’s cosine wherry.  This is the boat that Matt rowed in the first Widgeon Creek Row.

 

2015 Blood Moon Eclipse Row More kayaks assemble on the ramp.

 

2015 Blood Moon Eclipse Row Close-up of Matt’s Cosine Wherry.  Matt has rowed the Columbia River heading north from near U.S. border (canal flats).  He did the trip with row boat years ago and got as far as far as Golden.

 

2015 Blood Moon Eclipse Row 5:41pm and the sunset starts.

 

2015 Blood Moon Eclipse Row The water is still quite choppy.

 

2015 Blood Moon Eclipse Row I am rowing in the forward station and my wife, Pat is sitting in the stern seat.

 

2015 Blood Moon Eclipse Row We are milling around in front of the Club, waiting for the other boats.

 

2015 Blood Moon Eclipse Row Pat gets an artsy shot of me rowing into the sunset.

 

2015 Blood Moon Eclipse Row The kayakers are launching.

 

2015 Blood Moon Eclipse Row Matt picks up  his crew for the row.

 

2015 Blood Moon Eclipse Row Norah is rowing her Mirror Dinghy tonight.

 

2015 Blood Moon Eclipse Row She heads out past the Ambleside Fishing Pier.

 

2015 Blood Moon Eclipse Row Norah & Mirror, sunset silhouette.

 

2015 Blood Moon Eclipse Row 5:57pm, the sun is right on the horizon.

 

2015 Blood Moon Eclipse Row Close-up, Vancouver Island in the background, Bowen Island & Lighthouse park to the right.

 

2015 Blood Moon Eclipse Row We row & paddle past the Ambleside Fishing Pier towards the setting sun.

 

2015 Blood Moon Eclipse Row Either side of the sun, Vancouver Island to the left and in the far distance to the right, Then Sechelt, Bowen Island and Lighthouse Park.

 

2015 Blood Moon Eclipse Row The water is still quite choppy and it is hard to get photographs focused.

 

2015 Blood Moon Eclipse Row Norah and the kayakers continue to head West.

 

2015 Blood Moon Eclipse Row The apartments along Bellevue Avenue, West Vancouver.

 

2015 Blood Moon Eclipse Row The Sun is half-way down on the horizon.

 

2015 Blood Moon Eclipse Row 6:00pm, The sun is going below the horizon.  

 

2015 Blood Moon Eclipse Row Barely any sun left.  

 

 2015 Blood Moon Eclipse Row I was hoping to see the green flash as the sun sets.  Alas, I have never seen it.  But it does exist.  

 

2015 Blood Moon Eclipse Row Blurry picture of Matt rowing his Cosine Wherry.  The water is still unsettled.  

 

2015 Blood Moon Eclipse Row Good seats for the sunset.  Now it is time to watch for the “Blood Moon”.

 

2015 Blood Moon Eclipse Row

 Nothing to see yet.  Half of the lights on the Lions Gate Bridge are out.  

 

 

2015 Blood Moon Eclipse Row A party-boat cruises into Howe Sound.   

 

2015 Blood Moon Eclipse Row The darkness deepens to the west.  There is still quite a chop running.  Outgoing tide?  

 

 2015 Blood Moon Eclipse Row Twilight reflection.

 

2015 Blood Moon Eclipse Row Still no sign of the “Blood Moon”.

 

2015 Blood Moon Eclipse Row It is after 7:00pm and the “Blood Moon” is in this photograph.  I is so faint that it cannot be seen in the haze.  The moon rose at 6:58pm and the eclipse is at its fullest at 7:47pm.

Unfortunately, Gwragedd Annwn is moving too much to take a photo.  None of the photographs I took after this one turned out.

We row back to Hollyburn Sailing Club for a pot luck supper.  The “Blood Moon” does rise above the haze.  It is faint, but visible.  As Urban Oarsman Matt says:  “It’s an eclipse!  What do you expect to see?”  When the moon is well above the haze it is quite spectacular.  The the eclipse ends at 9:30pm, leaving the full moon to tower above us.  

   2015 Blood Moon Eclipse Row The “Blood Moon” Eclipse Row.  Well worth it.

2015 Blood Moon Eclipse RowGood Rowing,

Mike

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A dipping lug sail for Gwragedd Annwn. Making the mast part II

Making a Dipping Lugsail for Gwragedd Annwn

Gwragedd Annwn’s mast is 17’10¾” long, tapering from 2⅜” at the base to 2½” at the partners,  to 2″ at the top of the mast.  It weighs 19.4 lbs.

I have finished sanding the mast and put two coats of thinned semi-gloss spar Varnish on to seal the mast.  I do not like gloss Varnish, always finding it too glaring in the summer sun. The top of the mast is held in the jig by a screw.  This allows the mast to be rotated during Varnishing.  Time to add the coats!

Making a Dipping Lugsail for Gwragedd Annwn

You should have seen the look on the face of the sales clerk when I asked him to put the varnish into the shaker.  He thought I was asking him to perform an unnatural act.  In 45+ years of varnishing wood, I have never brushed on bubbles “from the can”.  I have only had a bubble problem if the wood was warming up and off-gassing.  By the time I got home and opened the can, there were no bubbles and the varnish was thoroughly mixed.

 

 

Making a Dipping Lugsail for Gwragedd Annwn Where the router slipped, filled in with epoxy and sanding dust.

I varnish against the rules.  We had a spat of warm, sunny weather here and I put on the next coat of varnish as soon as the prior coat was dry to the touch.  As many as six coats in a day.  No sanding between coats.  I did this for a week.  I kept putting coats on until I had used up 90% of the one liter can, probably more than 40 coats.  I discovered this technique when I varnished the red cedar railing on my house deck.  The finish on the deck railing, with minor touch-ups, lasted 23 years.  I did another major varnishing this year, coating and re-coating until I used up the can of varnish.  Should be good for another 23 years.

 

 

Making a Dipping Lugsail for Gwragedd Annwn The clothes-pin splice needed a little filler, epoxy and sanding dust.

The only problem that I have found with this technique is that the varnish takes a very long time to dry “Hard”.  This is not a problem where you are not going to use the spar, oar, etc., for a bit.  For example, when I did Gwragedd Annwn’s oars, I knew that they would sit with her, under her cover for two weeks before I would be using them.  Gwragedd Annwn, sitting outside in the sunshine at Hollyburn Sailing Club for that time with the oars under her cover, thoroughly dried them out.

 

 

Making a Dipping Lugsail for Gwragedd Annwn The base of the mast, held by a screw.  I used a screwdriver in this screw to rotate the mast when Varnishing the base of mast.

The problem with using a rotating jig for Varnishing is that you end up with screw holes in the ends of the mast.

 

 

Making a Dipping Lugsail for Gwragedd Annwn This knot was small enough to leave in.

 

 

Making a Dipping Lugsail for Gwragedd Annwn The clothes-pin splice jig worked very well.  I think that this is a good scarph.

 

 

Making a Dipping Lugsail for Gwragedd Annwn Top of the clothes-pin splice and the gouge made by the router slipping.

 

 

Making a Dipping Lugsail for Gwragedd Annwn Sanding the varnish for the final coats.

 

 

Making a Dipping Lugsail for Gwragedd Annwn It does not matter how careful you are, I always seem to get some runs and sags.

 

 

Making a Dipping Lugsail for Gwragedd Annwn I used 220 and them 320 grit sanding paper.

A quick wipe with a turpentine rag to take the dust off and then more Varnish.

 

 

Making a Dipping Lugsail for Gwragedd Annwn The rotation jig, with the screw backed out of the top of the mast.

 

 

Making a Dipping Lugsail for Gwragedd AnnwnThe rotation jig at the base of the mast, mast removed.

Ready to fill in the rotation jig screw holes.

 

 

Making a Dipping Lugsail for Gwragedd Annwn The screw hole in the top of the mast.

 

 

Making a Dipping Lugsail for Gwragedd Annwn The screw hole in the base (bottom) of the mast.

I printed two Urban Oarsman logs and used the varnish to glue them to the mast.  Again, it takes forever for the varnish to dry under the paper and stick the decals to the mast.

Making a Dipping Lugsail for Gwragedd Annwn Urban Oarsman logo Varnished onto the Forward side of the mast.

 

 

Making a Dipping Lugsail for Gwragedd Annwn Old Man Bretner, Boatbuilder logo Varnished onto the Aft side of the mast.

 

 

Making a Dipping Lugsail for Gwragedd Annwn Fitting the bamboo skewer for the top hole.

 

 

Making a Dipping Lugsail for Gwragedd Annwn Glueing the skewer in.

 

 

Making a Dipping Lugsail for Gwragedd Annwn Generous with the glue.

 

 

Making a Dipping Lugsail for Gwragedd Annwn Excess wiped off of the base.

 

 

Making a Dipping Lugsail for Gwragedd Annwn Excess wiped off the top of the mast.

You can see in the above photo where the coats of Varnish have sagged.  I will fix these when I Varnish over the bamboo skewers.

 

 

Making a Dipping Lugsail for Gwragedd Annwn I used a hammer and a punch to insure that the skewer was all the way in.

 

 

Making a Dipping Lugsail for Gwragedd AnnwnTop and bottom.

The next step will be to varnish the mast ends over the bamboo plugs when the glue has dried.

Tee Shirt Chart finalfinal

Happy rowing,

Mike

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Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row. March 31st, 2015.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel RowThe tides for the row are:  High high at 5:30am, 2.6m/8.5′; High low at 12:00. 1.3m/4.3′; Low high at 4:45pm, 2.0m/6.6′.  The tide will be outgoing until noon for the row down to the Brunette.  There will not be a large rise from noon to 4:45pm, .7m/2.6′ so I do not expect there to be an upstream tidal current for the row back to the Maquabeak Park boat launch.

 

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row Gwragedd Annwn at the Maquabeak Park boat launch.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row Gwragedd Annwn with the bridge deconstruction dock in the background.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row The deconstruction crew has refurbished the dock, putting a water level gauge on one of the pilings.  The markings are in meters.  The new Port Mann Bridge is to the left (East).  The orange structure visible underneath the middle of the bridge is what is left of the old Port Mann Bridge.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row The current down river is almost 5km/hr.  Besides taking my GPS navigatin unit, I always take paper charts and topo maps.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row I have a vaavud wind meter.  It works with my phone.  It is reading 20.5km/hr.  The wind is coming up river.  If I row downstream, I get helped by the current.  If I row upriver, the wind pushes me up against the current.  If I take my oars out of the water, the wind and current almost ballence each other off.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel RowI believe this creek is called Dawes Hill.  The mouth is blocked by this big booming log.  The creek goes under three bridges and seems to disappear at United Boulevard.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row At the higest tides, I could work my way around the log…I will have to come back in June when the Fraser is higher to go any further up this creek.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row Dog in a log.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row The log sorting ground is active.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row They are using an excavator on a barge to sort logs.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row Seaspan barges moored on the North Shore.  They were here on the Sapperton Channel Row of March 16th, 2015.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row The more in the middle of the Fraser I am, the more I feel the wind and waves.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row One entrance to the Brunette.  I row in.  This is as far down river as I got in the Sapperton Channel Row of March 16th, 2015.  Then the way was blocked by log booms.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row The closer I row towards the river bank the more the wind and waves fade.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row For maximun visibility, I row backwards into the channel.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row The channel goes right through the middle of the old Canadian Forest Products site.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row I am on the lookout for loose rock.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row Looking out (South) the way I came in.  Why the steel I-beam girders?

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row Is it to hold the sides out?  There is a gauge to the left (East) side.  Once through this part, I turn Gwragedd Annwn around and row normally.  

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row The channel banks are now rocky.  I see them.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel RowI row on to the next bridge along the channel.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel RowThis is the Canfor Avenue Bridge.  There is a gauge on the South-West side.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row There is another gauge on the North-West side of the Bridge.  If you look at the top of the gauge, you will see that there are two sets of numbers.  The 9 to 0 numbers on the long gauge and the smaller squares with the numbers 1 to 4 spaced 1 meter apart on the right.  The gauge seems to read .7 meters.  Enough depth for Gwragedd Annwn.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row I look to the right (East)  up the Brunette, another Canfor Avenue Bridge in the distance.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row To the Left (West) the Brunette runs along Brunette and Columbia Avenue.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row For maximun visibility, I row backwards down the Brunette.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row Old tree fort.  The river is tree lined on both banks with industrial land beyond.  

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row The Skytrain track is barely visible to the right (North).

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row A Skytrain passes by.

Brunette River Sapperton Channel Row (62)A small creek enters from the North.  Through the bushes, I spot a beaver dam.  Pretty marginal habitat.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row Another stream enters from the North.  Skytrain drainage?

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row A fishing lure stuck in a tree branch.  People fish here?!?

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row I continue down the Brunette.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row There is not much current or wind here.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row Coming up to a railway bridge.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row There are a bunch of white plastic pipes stuck in the river bed.  I do not know what for.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row I maneuver around the pipes.  You can see the current washing against them.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row Sign in front of the Skytrain station. You cannot get there from here.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row West side of the railway bridge looking North at the Skytrain station.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row FedEx truck on the Spruce Street Bridge.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row Going under the Spruce Street Bridge.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row The next bridge is unnamed.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row I sis not see any traffic while I rowed here.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row Shadow patterns on the underside.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row More shadow patterns.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row Unnamed pipe crossing.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row I see an anchored boat past the Cumberland Street (?) Bridge.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row The Skytrain line runs parallel to the Brunette River.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row Coming up to the bridge.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row There is a pier where the Brunette enters the Fraser.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row The boat anchored here is the Tuesday Sunrise built and owned by Randy van Eyk.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row I had a nice chat with him, he built the boat in 1987.  He is now waiting for engine parts to arrive.  He has been anchored here for a while.  Google Earth picture of July 14th, 2014 shows his boat:Randy van Eyk's boatRandy is a member of the BC Nautical Resident Association.  Their website is:  www.bcnr.org

The BCNR’s mission statement is to:

1. Preserve and support the tradition of living aboard one’s vessel;
2. Promote environmental awareness among liveaboards;
3. Establish effective communications and resolve issues of concern to liveaboards;
4. Serve as a voice for liveaboards regarding activities that affect BC waterways;

With a mandate to liaise with community and government groups regarding development and activities that affect BC waterways and the people who live upon them.

 

Randy seemed like a nice guy.  I wish him and the BCNR well.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row The pier where the Brunette enters the Fraser.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row I stick my nose out to check conditions.  Looking East in this photo.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row Looking South here.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row South-West towards the Pattullo Bridge.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row Pattullo Bridge, Sapperton Landing park.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row I decide that it is too windy to row up the Fraser, so I row back up the Brunette.  Let us see how far up I can get.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row I leave Randy van Eyk and  the Tuesday Sunrise behind.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row Another gauge.  It does not seem as if the gauges are cordinated together.  I can just make out the numbers 8, 9 & 0; maybe the number 1 at the top.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row No wind and little current.  Nice rowing here.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row Back at the Canfor Avenue Bridge junction.  I am looking East, up the Brunette.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row Looking down the “Through the middle of the old Canadian Forest Products site”, to the Fraser, fork.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row Looking West down the Brunette.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row I now row up the Brunette River.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row I think that this railway bridge is abandoned.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row The second Canfor Avenue Bridge.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row I row beyond the Bridge.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row This is the new Braid Street Bridge.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row Still shiny and new.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row I row under the Bridge.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row Up the Brunette I row!

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row The current begins to quicken.  The river shallows.  I am nearing the end…

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row The end of the row.  I cannot go any further, the current is too strong and there is an obstacle across the river with breaking standing waves.  I need higher water to go further on.  There is a fisherman by the rapids.  I am the first rowboat he has ever seen here.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row Another gauge at the new Braid Street Bridge.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row I let the current carry me downstream.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row Back at the fork to the Fraser through the old Canadian Forest Products site.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row A last look down the Brunette, and I row under the Canfor Avenue Bridge towards the Fraser.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row I leave the junction behind.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row Back under the I-beams.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row The tide should be rising, but there is a slight outflow current.  Wierd.  I guess the tide is not rising quickly enough to push water into the Brunette and cause it to  flow backwards here.

 Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row Almost through.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row The river looks pretty calm.  Maybe I am in rowing luck.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row I leave this unstable area for more stable areas.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row West towards the Pattullo Bridge.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row East towards the New Port Mann bridge and the Maquabeak Park boat launch.  I row between the log booms and the shore, staying out of the wind and current.  I just hope that there is enought room for me to row between the shore and the booms.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row Well, I had to pop out from between the booms and the shore…the way was blocked.  I am in the current, but I find that the wind is pushing me up river strongly enough to nearly counteract the current.  Still, it is tough rowing.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row Geese on a barge.  Not as good a title as “Snakes on a plane”, but much more realistic.  Canadian Geese can be pretty nasty.  Ever try to walk on a grassy area where they have been?

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row The log sort excavator working.  I am not taking as many pictures as I have to keep rowing to make progress.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row With the wind blowing upriver, this piece of foam was making better time than I was.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row A tugboat, the Harken No.7 comes up from astern.

Brunette River/Sapperton Channel Row Nice guys, they give me a lot of searoom.  I am almost at the boat launch.  I row Gwragedd Annwn to the dock and pack her up for the trip home.

Brunette River Sapperton Channel Row Google Earth2GPS track of the row.

Brunette River Sapperton Channel Row Google Earth1 The Brunette River part.

Sapperton Channel ChartCopy of the chart I took with me.

Brunette River Sapperton Channel Row end plateThe Brunette River part was the calmest, with the Sapperton Channel being the most challenging part to row.  Being given a good run for the money by a foam block was pretty humbling.  The hardest part about rowing in the Fraser is the downstream current.  The upstream wind helped even if it did kick up a lot of chop.

 

The trick is to row upstream with the incoming tide, downstream with the outgoing tide and plan your row accordingly.

 

Mike

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Siwash Rock Sunset Row. May 31st, 2014.

Siwash Rock Sunset

May 31st, 2014.  A perfect evening to watch the Sunset at Siwash Rock.  Of course being the Urban Oarsman, I will watch from Gwragedd Annwn.

The Low low tide was around 2:00pm, .9m/3′ and the High high will be around 9:30pm, 4.5m/14.8′.  Sunset will be around 8:20.  

Siwash Rock Sunset I row due South, away from the Ambleside launch ramp at 6:40pm.  

Siwash Rock Sunset The incomming tide pushes me towards First Narrows and Stanley Park.  

 

 Siwash Rock Sunset About 20 minutes later, I arrive off Stanley Park.  At low tide, this is a boulder beach, with several large eyebolts in the rock.  

 

Siwash Rock Sunset I pass the ramp to the beach and row on to Siwash Rock.

 

Siwash Rock Sunset Except at the highest tides, it is always a good idea to stay 300 feet (100 meters) or more off the shore at Stanley Park.  There are many rocks along the shore.  Some quite far out.

 

Siwash Rock Sunset I row into the cove behind Siwash Rock and begin to take photos.

 

Siwash Rock Sunset A cyclist rides by.

 

 Siwash Rock Sunset The signature trees. I understand that the original tree died in the exceptionly dry Summer of 1965 and these are replacement trees.

 

Siwash Rock Sunset I row around to get different photos of the sun behind Siwash.

 

Siwash Rock Sunset The sky is cloudless.

 

Siwash Rock Sunset The high tide channel between the rock and the shore.

 

Siwash Rock Sunset I circumnavigate the rock to take some photos from the outside.

 

Siwash Rock Sunset I have always wondered about the “eyespot”.

 

Siwash Rock Sunset Close-up of the “eyespot”.

 

Siwash Rock Sunset Very few people see Siwash Rock from this angle.  

 

Siwash Rock Sunset Looking South-East at Siwash.

 

Siwash Rock Sunset The Ocean Seagull heads out of Burrard Inlet, going to one of the English Bay anchorages. That is Sentinal Hill behind the freighter.

 

Siwash Rock Sunset Other freighters sit in the middle of English Bay.  The black streak is a cormorant flying by.

 

Siwash Rock Sunset Freighters on the North side anchorages, off Jericho beach.

 

 Siwash Rock Sunset Ocean Seagull changes course and heads for an anchorage.

 

Siwash Rock Sunset A couple of Ocean Seagull Sunset shots:

 

 

Siwash Rock Sunset Her anchor is ready.

 

 

Siwash Rock Sunset She is a general cargo frieghter.

 

 

Siwash Rock Sunset I never do see her port of registry.

 

Siwash Rock Sunset Passing behind Siwash.

 

Siwash Rock Sunset Photo of her through the channel.

 

Siwash Rock Sunset I take some more photos of Siwash, trying to get a really good one.

 

Siwash Rock Sunset With the sun behind the rock, you can see some more of the East side.

 

Siwash Rock Sunset The three Douglas Fir trees, planted in 1968 still survive.

 

Siwash Rock Sunset Another Sunset photo.  The arm of  land in the background is Lighthouse Park in West Vancouver and the tall mountain to the right is Bowen Island.

Siwash Rock Sunset About an hour into the row and the view is wonderful.

 

Siwash Rock Sunset I am just drifting in Gwragedd Annwn and taking photos.

 

Siwash Rock Sunset I guess it would be helpful if I really knew what I was doing.

 

Siwash Rock Sunset There are a lot of people on the seawall.

 

Siwash Rock Sunset I am trying to get the trees more silhouetted.

 

Siwash Rock Sunset Horizon is a bit more level in this one.

 

Siwash Rock Sunset I float behind Siwash and take photos as the sun sets.

 

Siwash Rock Sunset Trying to get Siwash’s shadow in the picture.

 

Siwash Rock Sunset A good silhouette picture.

 

 

Siwash Rock Sunset The sun is starting to hit the mountains.

 

Siwash Rock Sunset I row out, through the channel to get a different view.

 

Siwash Rock Sunset View from the seaward side.

 

Siwash Rock Sunset Sinking below Bowen Island, Lighthouse Park.

 

Siwash Rock Sunset I zoom in.  The big problem with using the zoom lens is that Gwragedd Annwn is not a stable photography platform.  This is the best of many shots.

 

Siwash Rock Sunset Back behind Siwash.

 

Siwash Rock Sunset Kinda like that redish streak.

 

Siwash Rock Sunset Try again without Gwragedd Annwn’s rowing mirror in frame.

 

 

Siwash Rock Sunset It is a lovely evening.

 

 

Siwash Rock Sunset Close-up of the Douglas Firs with a crescent moon sliver to the left of the lowest branch.

 

Siwash Rock Sunset The sun is half way below the Bowen Island mountainline.

 

Siwash Rock Sunset Just dissappearing behind the ridge.

 

Siwash Rock Sunset A bit of haze glows in the sunset.

 

Siwash Rock Sunset The crescent moon.

 

Siwash Rock Sunset I row around to get the moon over the Douglas Firs.

 

Siwash Rock Sunset Close-up of the crescent moon.

 

Siwash Rock Sunset Moon to the south of the Douglas Firs.

 

Siwash Rock Sunset Moon to the North of the Douglas Firs.

 

Siwash Rock SunsetSunset.  A jet’s contrails glow.  A little after 8:00pm and time to row home.  The tidal flow through First Narrows has slowed and it will be an easy row across.  I will be packed up and on my way home by twilight’s end.

Siwash Rock SunsetSiwash Rock Sunset.  A good row.

Mike

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